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Old 01-25-2013, 12:21 PM   #201 (permalink)
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I thought I would let you all know that I just figured out what that code means in the METAR.

The code deals with Ice Accretion:

Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
Ice accretion for the current hour encoded in hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) has the following format:
• I1nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “1" - is the reported time period (one hour) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.”

Three (3-) Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
• The accretion of ice over the past three hour time period in one-hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) would have the format: I3nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “3" - is the reported time period (three hours) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.” The remark may be encoded at the intermediate synoptic times (0300, 0900, 1500, or 2100 UTC). When conditions warrant, the “I3nnn” remark will be encoded immediately following the hourly ice accretion amount (I1nnn).

Six (6-) Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
• The accretion of ice over the past six hour time period in one-hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) will have the format: I6nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “6" - is the reported time period (six hours) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.” The remark may be encoded at the mandatory synoptic times (0600, 1200, 1800, or 0000 UTC). When conditions warrant, the “I6nnn” remark will be encoded immediately following the hourly ice accretion amount (I1nnn).

This could be very helpful to us but the NWS has not installed this update to all stations yet.
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:38 PM   #202 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desktop_pilot View Post
I thought I would let you all know that I just figured out what that code means in the METAR.

The code deals with Ice Accretion:

Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
Ice accretion for the current hour encoded in hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) has the following format:
• I1nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “1" - is the reported time period (one hour) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.”

Three (3-) Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
• The accretion of ice over the past three hour time period in one-hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) would have the format: I3nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “3" - is the reported time period (three hours) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.” The remark may be encoded at the intermediate synoptic times (0300, 0900, 1500, or 2100 UTC). When conditions warrant, the “I3nnn” remark will be encoded immediately following the hourly ice accretion amount (I1nnn).

Six (6-) Hourly Ice Accretion Amount:
• The accretion of ice over the past six hour time period in one-hundredths of an inch (0.01 in.) will have the format: I6nnn Where: “I” - is the icing indicator for the group “6" - is the reported time period (six hours) “nnn” - is the thickness accumulated to the nearest one-hundredth of an inch (0.01 in.). A trace amount is encoded as “000.” The remark may be encoded at the mandatory synoptic times (0600, 1200, 1800, or 0000 UTC). When conditions warrant, the “I6nnn” remark will be encoded immediately following the hourly ice accretion amount (I1nnn).

This could be very helpful to us but the NWS has not installed this update to all stations yet.
Very handy information! I have never been able to find what that means.

Welcome to the forums as well
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:53 PM   #203 (permalink)
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Welcome to the forums. I'm curious as to where you found the explanation for it.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:47 PM   #204 (permalink)
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It was a simple process but I didn't think of it at first because nobody on several forums had any idea and all I thought it would be was a simple "ah someone on a forum will know". So today I decided to called an airport and the lady there didn't know, so then I talked to one of the guys in the tower he wasn't sure but suggested I contact the NWS, the guy there wasn't sure but he said that it just started showing up after an update with the software on their ASOS. That answer gave me the extra piece of info that seems very simple in hind sight, all I had to do was search google for "ASOS I3000" (click the "Search only for ASOS I3000" link) and the first non-ad listing is a pdf from the NOAA about the new software and what the new groups mean, including the ice accretion one.

It goes to show that forums and the internet are great but sometimes you have to go a little beyond to find the answers.

Last edited by desktop_pilot; 01-26-2013 at 12:40 AM.
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:17 PM   #205 (permalink)
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I always liked how if the weather sensor needs maintenance they put a $ in the metar.

It is the government, after all.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:41 PM   #206 (permalink)
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Well, yesterday I got signed off for Instrument Written, and once I pass it the instructor is going to sign me off for the check ride, since I meet all the requirements and he thinks I am ready. Not that I don't agree with him, but I am a bit nervous since I have heard horror stories about IFR checkrides.

I hope my 400 hours, multi rating and a lot of 'good' hours as well as the fact that I didn't rush through the training, but sort of naturally came to satisfy the requirements and have enough acquired knowledge and enough 'real' IFR experience will put the examiner at ease. But still I'd like to hear your 'last' minute tips and tricks DOs and DONTs.
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:52 PM   #207 (permalink)
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Vlad, I think you'll be fine considerd the amount of good experience you've gained over the years. Know the regs, know the AIM, know the PTS all go without saying.

During the flight, stay relaxed during the flight and don't rush.
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:38 PM   #208 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Foxcow View Post
Vlad, I think you'll be fine considerd the amount of good experience you've gained over the years. Know the regs, know the AIM, know the PTS all go without saying.

During the flight, stay relaxed during the flight and don't rush.
The reason I am 'worried' is that I have heard stories of people failing for 'simple' things.

Here is one question for example that I was debating over with my instructor the other night while doing briefing for an ILS approach.

The airplane flown was a C150 (that's what I am taking to checkride, and next day I will take a seneca there and shoot a single engine approach).

I told him that I will be flying the approach at 110kts. His answer was 'as long as you know that it will fail you on your checkride I am ok with it now. It should be flown at 90kts'. I didn't argue much with him, thinking I will do some thinking, research and get back on that.

Now, my point is that I as a PIC can select any speed for approach that I find is suitable for the situation, aircraft, environment and ensures safety.
Here is the chain of my thoughts.

1. If I am going to be in IMC I want to be inside it as less time as possible
2. I have enough ceiling of visibility to fly for category B
3. the weather is reported to be smooth with almost no wind conditions
4. I am flying C150 and I can slow it down in a blink of an eye when I have visual with the runway and make a safe landing
5. my interpretation of the approach speed of formula, is that it's a mare 'minimum' recommendation, and as far as I am not exceeding any limitations put by POH I am good to select any speed as I find suitable
6. after all, I am flying an ILS into an airport and most probably I have got jets flying 110-140 behind me, why irritate everybody around
7. Carrying extra energy for a light aircraft in IMC is actually good thing (in my opinion as a pilot)

So now, fellow pilots and instructors can you please tell me if I am 'wrong'? I understand that the examiner could question the 'unusual' approach speed, but disqualify me for that?
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Last edited by Vlad_Arm; 02-27-2013 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:36 PM   #209 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlad_Arm View Post
The reason I am 'worried' is that I have heard stories of people failing for 'simple' things.

Here is one question for example that I was debating over with my instructor the other night while doing briefing for an ILS approach.

The airplane flown was a C150 (that's what I am taking to checkride, and next day I will take a seneca there and shoot a single engine approach).

I told him that I will be flying the approach at 110kts. His answer was 'as long as you know that it will fail you on your checkride I am ok with it now. It should be flown at 90kts'. I didn't argue much with him, thinking I will do some thinking, research and get back on that.

Now, my point is that I as a PIC can select any speed for approach that I find is suitable for the situation, aircraft, environment and ensures safety.
Here is the chain of my thoughts.

1. If I am going to be in IMC I want to be inside it as less time as possible
2. I have enough ceiling of visibility to fly for category B
3. the weather is reported to be smooth with almost no wind conditions
4. I am flying C150 and I can slow it down in a blink of an eye when I have visual with the runway and make a safe landing
5. my interpretation of the approach speed of formula, is that it's a mare 'minimum' recommendation, and as far as I am not exceeding any limitations put by POH I am good to select any speed as I find suitable
6. after all, I am flying an ILS into an airport and most probably I have got jets flying 110-140 behind me, why irritate everybody around
7. Carrying extra energy for a light aircraft in IMC is actually good thing (in my opinion as a pilot)

So now, fellow pilots and instructors can you please tell me if I am 'wrong'? I understand that the examiner could question the 'unusual' approach speed, but disqualify me for that?

Vlad,

you make some good points. At the pilots discretion and depending on the situation, you can effectively change categories so long as you aren't in violation of the regs/poh/etc. However, consider the stabilized approach in general aviation. One pilot may consider flying a 152 at 110 kts to minimums on an ILS within the realm of stabilized but another may not. For the purpose of a checkride, why not make the approach category A to play it safe? If ATC asks for something faster due to traffic, perfect.
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Old 02-27-2013, 03:30 PM   #210 (permalink)
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Vlad,

you make some good points. At the pilots discretion and depending on the situation, you can effectively change categories so long as you aren't in violation of the regs/poh/etc. However, consider the stabilized approach in general aviation. One pilot may consider flying a 152 at 110 kts to minimums on an ILS within the realm of stabilized but another may not. For the purpose of a checkride, why not make the approach category A to play it safe? If ATC asks for something faster due to traffic, perfect.

Hence, my post here. I have no intention to go and try provoking the examiner, or have a debate over FAR's.


On the good side though i feel good about my upcoming written, although I gotta study more
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:25 AM   #211 (permalink)
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I'm with Fox on this one. I would agree with everything you said there. All good points. However, if your examiner won't give you your endorsement over such a point, please him, get the endorsement, then go and exercise your good judgement after you are done and are a certified Instrument pilot. Do what you have to to get your Instrument Rating done, please whoever you have to please, and just do whatever he wants . . . . within reason of course . Otherwise, your "worries" and "good points" are all academic for you if you can't actually fly in those conditions.
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:51 PM   #212 (permalink)
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Thanks guys!
I passed my IFR written today and the IFR Multi/Single checkride is scheduled next Saturday.
I also found out I am just 4-5 hours short of instruction to be eligible for Commercial Checkride (just 4-5 ours instruction on commercial maneuvers), so it seems that I am going for my commercial single/multi as well. I have no intention of making career out of aviation but wouldn't hurt to have license that don't expire. If ever needed I could just get back in shape, or considering the fact that I live in LA, I can find maybe some freelance flight gigs to do here and there to keep things fun.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:04 PM   #213 (permalink)
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Know any youth interested in General Aviation?

Keep Calm and Experience the World of General Aviation - YouTube

Show young friends and family this short video about getting involved in the General Aviation Industry. It's a very brief overview of some of the advantages and disadvantages of participating in the General Aviation Industry at a young age.
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Old 09-01-2014, 05:08 AM   #214 (permalink)
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I read some of you had their IFR check ride , I am sure you got it right and approved it.

I still remember a funny story told me by my ex-flight instructor. She told me her examiner stop her just during taxy because during take-off preparation he asked: "do you have another pair of glasses ?" . She was wearing glasses since suffering of miopia. She didn't so , he forced here to come back and repeat the exam another day because she failed it.

She had to repeat 5 times before he finally approved her!

This is aviation and sometimes it is not funny at all...
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Old 09-15-2014, 12:24 PM   #215 (permalink)
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I read some of you had their IFR check ride , I am sure you got it right and approved it.

I still remember a funny story told me by my ex-flight instructor. She told me her examiner stop her just during taxy because during take-off preparation he asked: "do you have another pair of glasses ?" . She was wearing glasses since suffering of miopia. She didn't so , he forced here to come back and repeat the exam another day because she failed it.

She had to repeat 5 times before he finally approved her!

This is aviation and sometimes it is not funny at all...
To me, that sounds like a ridiculous reason to fail. There are practical test standards that have to be followed by pilot-candidate and examiner alike. I've been known to "fire" examiners before--that is, stop sending students to them--for stuff like this. If you are going to use an examiner repeatedly you want some assurance that they are not milking students for money or abusing their position, that they will provide a fair checkride.
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