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Old 11-14-2007, 09:53 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I never felt completely comfortable with the wing low to the wind style of crosswind landings. I am able to perform much better landings with the "crab and kick" style, and it almost always keeps me right down the center line.

I was out this past weekend myself, and after not flying for a few months I had some horrible crosswind landings. I just kept at them though, until I got them to an acceptable crosswind landing where I wasn't pile drive the Cherokee into the pavement. It only took about 7 landings to get back into the grove again.
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Old 11-14-2007, 11:06 PM   #22 (permalink)
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One question I have always just kinda kept in the back of my head is, how does one approach a new plane? After you get your ppl, you can fly a good bunch of different a/c, so what happens if you want to rent one that you've never flown before, first off, is that allowed?

Another example of the same type of thing would be how the airplane flies, they teach us when to fly at what speed and how many flaps and when to turn and what to do and bla bla. When you have an unfamiliar airplane, do you just spend time and study up the takeoff, cruise and approach speeds that the operating handbook tells you?

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Old 11-14-2007, 11:15 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Tango. Good question. Legally you can fly any single engine land aircraft. but for renting flight schools require 10 hours class and type for a new aircraft.

studying the POH is a great start. Learning the speeds and certain unique characteristics is job one.

as far as when to turn how fast to go etc YOU should know those things as a pilot , dont be dependent on somebody else to tell you when. Just apply the general knowledge to each aircraft you fly, flow checks etc. the faster and more complex the plane, the more often and sooner you do those checks.
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:41 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by ATSMark
Tango. Good question. Legally you can fly any single engine land aircraft. but for renting flight schools require 10 hours class and type for a new aircraft.


I wouldn't be quite so general. I can't think of any A/C checkout that took me more than an hour at a flight school.


TangoDelta, really most the singles your going to fly will really fly basically the same, they do have their own minor differences, but all the same principles apply. Many of the A/C I've flown I've had zero instruction in, I just got in it and flew it. It's literally that simple. You just make sure to take alittle extra time preflighting, and take a look at where everything is in the cockpit, and just generally give your self alittle extra margin for error on that first time around the patch. As far as the speeds go I gave up trying to remember the specific speeds for dozens of different A/C types. If you fly the arcs on the airspeed indicator you'll be just fine. use 1.3-1.5 times the bottom of the white arch and that will be a good approach speed. The airspeed indicator will really tell you just about every airspeed you need to know.
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:45 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Oh and you should really get a feel for when to turn, it's really not A/C specific. I used to use when the runway thresh hold was half way between the end of the wing and the tip of the horizontal stab. to know when to start my base turn. That works well in all singles, I've found.

Of coarse the plane I fly now I can't even see the tail!
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Old 11-15-2007, 01:31 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Well going from a 152 to a 172 surely won't take more than an hour or 2. I guess my flight school is pretty unique. Going from a 152 will take at least 10 hours. Or going to the arrow, grob, cub, yankee, pitts( takes at least 20) super D...

Those are all aircraft not super easily transitioned from say a 152.
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Old 11-15-2007, 01:58 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Hum my school you just need a few touch and goes and a few minutes discussing the a/c limitations on the ground with a instructor to fly a different a/c.
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Old 11-15-2007, 04:23 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Ya its gonna depend on the aircraft. The super d took me an hour to get checked out in. But the arrow took 10 it was my first complex
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Old 11-15-2007, 05:16 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Whenever you think it does!
Do you have to join Imperial forces or can stay with Rebels ?
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:03 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Along the same lines, I've only flown one type of complex (Piper Arrow). That and the seminole are the only planes with constant speed props and gear that i've flown. Gear is easy since my instructor conditioned me to do a GUMP Check whenever i see a runway in front of me. But how does one know what throttle and prop settings to use without scrutinizing the POH? are there standard manifold pressure and RPM settings for your average single?
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:16 AM   #31 (permalink)
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all the high performance/constant speed planes I have flown go 25/25 after takeoff on climbout, then you increase MP as you get higher. then once cruising altitude you use the POH specified cruising power settings, whether you want 55% 65% etc.
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Old 11-16-2007, 02:48 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Power setting for normally aspirated pistons are pretty standard. Every N/A piston I've flown you T/O at full throttle and max RPM, then for climb you pull it back to 25in MP and 2500RPM (25 squared), and cruise at 23in MP and 2300RPM (23 squared). The power limitations are also on the gages in the form of green arcs and red lines.

On pretty much ANY A/C out there if you keep everything in the green your doing just fine. Really everything you need to know to fly a plane will be on the panel and gages. There are other specifics which obviously will be in the POH, but the panel is enough to get you up and going.
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Old 11-16-2007, 03:01 AM   #33 (permalink)
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very true. I cant remember off the top of my head buy the arrow i fly has a red arc , its either from 2100-2200 or 2200-2300.
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Old 11-16-2007, 03:25 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Sure it's a red arc and not a yellow arc? I've seen the yellow arc on the Arrow with the McCauley props, 1,500-1,950RPM.
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Old 11-16-2007, 12:25 PM   #35 (permalink)
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no its a definite red arc. I cant remember what prop it is but I dont think its a McCauley. I read in the POH it was a high load spot for the engine. Its an older hershey bar wing arrow , I will look in the POH to see the exact arc.
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Old 11-22-2007, 01:02 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Along the same lines, I've only flown one type of complex (Piper Arrow). That and the seminole are the only planes with constant speed props and gear that i've flown. Gear is easy since my instructor conditioned me to do a GUMP Check whenever i see a runway in front of me. But how does one know what throttle and prop settings to use without scrutinizing the POH?
and exactly what is wrong with scrutinizing the POH? I have about 1400 hours, am a CFI, and have flown about 2 dozen different types of 2 and 4 place singles and will absolutely not step into a new-to-me type without "scrutinizing the POH."

More generally, accident stats suggest that time in type is a strong predictive factor. Especially for the newer pilot, or even the long-time pilot who has only flown one type, it doesn't take much of a difference to throw things off and put the pilot behind the airplane. Transitions get much, much easier as they go on and the pilot learns from experience the differences among types to look for. But I think the "they're all the same" attitude has very little to do with the real-life experience of a pilot who has very little multiple-type experience and suggesting it's no big deal is a disservice to them.
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Old 11-22-2007, 04:08 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Heres a question. How did you guys get used to single pilot IFR conditions. I am amazed at the workload I face when my instructor basically puts it in my hands. Its more of a workout then flying the pitts for an hour, granted a different type of workout but boy I land sweaty with a headache....Its getting better , I guess it comes with experience.
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Old 11-22-2007, 04:36 PM   #38 (permalink)
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In my case, I did my instrument training at night, so when we had some daylight time, it all seemed easy.

First of all, the good news is that instrument training is artificially workload-intensive. You are asked to prepare for an approach in 3 minutes when, on a real flight, you might have an hour or more. But that's a good thing.

I think the real secret though is to have SOPs that keep you WAY ahead of the airplane. Almost all of them involve the "two most important things in IFR flight" - the =next= two things. Examples:

Especially if you have flip flop radios, never have anything other than a frequency you are using or the expected next frequency in the backup. That goes for both navs and comms.

Before you take off. What are you prepared to do? Do you know where you are going? Are the expected charts out and, if you know what to expect, already briefed? Are the radios already set? If not, what are you waiting for?

The other big item, I think, is to situationally aware of the big picture. IFR flight is all about knowing where you are, where you are going, and how you are going to get there. I have a lousy memory so a bunch of silly mnemonics to tell me how to memorize information on a chart that is in my line of sight makes absolutely no sense to me. But put it in the context of "where - where - how" and suddenly, they are not just numbers on a piece of paper. They have a context. So much of the focus on teaching approaches is on on the boxes with the numbers. Of course they are important, but I think understanding the plan view and where those numbers fit in is the real key to not getting behind.
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Old 11-22-2007, 04:48 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Sounds like I am right on track then. I did more than half my training at night which I think makes it more authentic under the hood I couldnt tell what the hell was going on outside.

I always make it practice to have the standby frequencies and back ups whenever needed. For instance on some approaches where I'm on the ILS and the other VOR isnt needed I will backup the ILS on the second VOR. etc etc. I always try to stay ahead of the airplane but its a workout. But you are very correct that preparing for an approach in 3 minutes and sometimes less. Hell I do the livermore one departure ,fly the stockton ILS, tracy VOR and livermore ILS approaches in 1.2. that is INSANE as far as workload goes but boy its good training.
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Old 11-22-2007, 10:28 PM   #40 (permalink)
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NotGonnaDoIt's advise is pretty good.

Having a good flow and having everything you'll need with in reach and always in the same place is the way I do it. I know where everything is in my chart bag by touch. Organization is key.
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