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Old 11-30-2007, 09:42 PM   #41 (permalink)
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I feel a little embarassed asking this so far into my IFR training...

But WTF are these dashed lines on the Surface Analysis/Prog Charts...?



It cuts across the isobars, so I would guess it's just showing areas of strong surface winds or shear??
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:03 PM   #42 (permalink)
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That's a dry line.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:17 PM   #43 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by Redguy
That's a dry line.
Wow, never heard of it.

Thanks, Red.

From the definition, it sounds like it's something an IFR pilot would like to know about - especially that last sentence!!!

Dry Line - A boundary separating moist and dry air masses, and an important factor in severe weather frequency in the Great Plains. It typically lies north-south across the central and southern high Plains states during the spring and early summer, where it separates moist air from the Gulf of Mexico (to the east) and dry desert air from the southwestern states (to the west). The dry line typically advances eastward during the afternoon and retreats westward at night. However, a strong storm system can sweep the dry line eastward into the Mississippi Valley, or even further east, regardless of the time of day. A typical dry line passage results in a sharp drop in humidity (hence the name), clearing skies, and a wind shift from south or southeasterly to west or southwesterly. (Blowing dust and rising temperatures also may follow, especially if the dry line passes during the daytime; see dry punch). These changes occur in reverse order when the dry line retreats westward. Severe and sometimes tornadic thunderstorms often develop along a dry line or in the moist air just to the east of it, especially when it begins moving eastward. See LP storm.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:55 PM   #44 (permalink)
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Yeah, storms from Dry Lines can be VERY violent! I don't F around with T-storms across the plains.
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Old 11-30-2007, 11:07 PM   #45 (permalink)
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Hummm...

I thought those were Trough and Ridges

Trough
An elongated area of relatively low atmospheric pressure, usually not associated with a closed circulation, and thus used to distinguish from a closed low. The opposite of ridge.

Ridge
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure; the opposite of trough.

Take a look at the following link for additional info (Line 5)-

http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/html/fntcodes2.shtml

Last edited by RatherBeFlying; 11-30-2007 at 11:17 PM.
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Old 12-02-2007, 11:24 AM   #46 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by RatherBeFlying
Hummm...

I thought those were Trough and Ridges

Trough
An elongated area of relatively low atmospheric pressure, usually not associated with a closed circulation, and thus used to distinguish from a closed low. The opposite of ridge.

Ridge
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure; the opposite of trough.

Take a look at the following link for additional info (Line 5)-

http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/html/fntcodes2.shtml
Bingo. With a reference yet. Might also be an outflow boundary.

In addition to your reference, here's the the full NOAA glossary:

http://www.srh.noaa.gov/oun/severewx...p#Introduction

Last edited by NotGonnaDoIt; 12-02-2007 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 12-02-2007, 12:24 PM   #47 (permalink)
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I guess a have a question that is slightly on topic. My last lesson got canceled cause of wind. It got me thinking how strong the winds have to be to get the airliners (or any other larger a/c ) to say "lets not fly". Winds for me held at about 25-35 knots, some areas had 40 knots!
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Old 12-02-2007, 02:43 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Don't know about the airlines, but we're only limited by a max 10kts tail wind component. Other that that it's all bets off! I've flown in some very strong winds, one example was I flew through the remnants of Katrina the day after it made land fall. That wasn't really as bad as I though it would be though since the winds where very consistent, there wasn't large gust or variations in direction. We got SOAKED to the bone though!
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Old 12-03-2007, 02:26 PM   #49 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by TangoDelta29
It got me thinking how strong the winds have to be to get the airliners (or any other larger a/c ) to say "lets not fly".
I asked a few pilots on frequency while I was at work today and here were their responses on max allowable crosswind component at landing...

B737/700 - 35kt max. Not a demonstrated limit, but company policy (Southwest Airlines)

Airbus 319 - 20kt sustained or gusts to 37. Max. demonstrated and company policy (Frontier Airlines)

E145 X-model - 30kt max. Demonstrated and company policy (Continental Express). He said he had landed once with that max 30kt crosswind, and said he doubted he could've done it if the winds had been any stronger than that.
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Old 12-03-2007, 04:32 PM   #50 (permalink)
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Have you ever seen video of Airbus/Boeing test pilots doing the "demonstration" for a demonstrated max?

I would poop myself (I think).

~ Christopher
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Old 12-03-2007, 10:26 PM   #51 (permalink)
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I think some companies also have some sort of sliding scale having to do with the runway friction index. I don't know if they have a company chart or what, but I know that when it falls below a certain RFI, the crosswind they're allowed drops drastically.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:34 PM   #52 (permalink)
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This is coming up a lot at the flight school I fly at. When flying under the hood I know that the person sitting in the right seat has to at least have their private rating. I have always thought since one person is under the hood and the other is flying as safety pilot that both could log PIC time. The new head of the aviation progam at the local community college says that both cannot log PIC time. I haven't check the regs yet and I plan to do so, I just wanted to get some opinions on this subject.
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Old 12-05-2007, 07:26 PM   #53 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by atcflyer
I asked a few pilots on frequency while I was at work today and here were their responses on max allowable crosswind component at landing...

B737/700 - 35kt max. Not a demonstrated limit, but company policy (Southwest Airlines)

Airbus 319 - 20kt sustained or gusts to 37. Max. demonstrated and company policy (Frontier Airlines)

E145 X-model - 30kt max. Demonstrated and company policy (Continental Express). He said he had landed once with that max 30kt crosswind, and said he doubted he could've done it if the winds had been any stronger than that.

Thanks! nothing better then the source.
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Old 12-06-2007, 12:23 AM   #54 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by PA28Aviator
This is coming up a lot at the flight school I fly at. When flying under the hood I know that the person sitting in the right seat has to at least have their private rating. I have always thought since one person is under the hood and the other is flying as safety pilot that both could log PIC time. The new head of the aviation progam at the local community college says that both cannot log PIC time. I haven't check the regs yet and I plan to do so, I just wanted to get some opinions on this subject.
They can, but it's not automatic.

Forget logging for a moment. There is only one person on any flight who is the real pilot in command - called the "acting" PIC.

Now, lLet's take those two private pilots. The rule is pretty straightforward, assuming two private pilots, both rated for the aircraft and both with medicals,

The flying pilot may always log PIC.
The safety pilot may also "log" PIC time IF the safety pilot is the one "acting" as PIC.
If the safety pilot is not the one "acting" as PIC, he may "log" SIC time.

It's pretty much all in the regs:

In the safety pilot scenario, the pilot who is doing the flying can log PIC time, whether or not he is the acting pilot in command. That's because FAR 61.51(e) says,

Quote:
A ... private pilot may log pilot-in-command time only for that flight time during which that person-- (i) Is the sole manipulator of the controls of an aircraft for which the pilot is rated
The safety pilot can also log PIC time, but only if he is also the person acting as the pilot in command of the flight. That's because of a combination of two regs. 61.51 says that
Quote:
A ... private pilot may log pilot-in-command time only for that flight time during which that person-- (iii)...is acting as pilot in command of an aircraft on which more than one pilot is required under...the regulations under which the flight is conducted.
If you go to 91.109(b), the reg that talks about the need for a safety pilot, you'll see that the safety pilot is required.

The FAA puts these two regs together and says that flight by a private pilot with a safety pilot is a flight requires more than one pilot, so both can log PIC - so long as the safety pilot is the one who is the acting pilot in command.

What about when the safety pilot isn't the "real" PIC? Then he can log SIC time, but you can find the reg that says that.

Hint - the answer to ALL questions about logging flight time are in FAR 61.51.
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Old 12-06-2007, 03:33 PM   #55 (permalink)
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Thanks.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:22 PM   #56 (permalink)
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The "what this means for you" answer:

Suppose that you go on a flight where the total flight time is 1.1 and virtually the whle flight is 'under the hood'. The Pilot Flying logs 1.1 total and 1.0 simulated instrument. In this case the safety pilot may log 1.0 PIC.

In any case, the safety pilot cannot log more time than the the other pilot logs simulated instrument, as they are only acting pic which the PF is under the hood.

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Old 12-06-2007, 10:34 PM   #57 (permalink)
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Another question since we're on the topic of logging flight time:

Can I log flight time when I was sole manipulator of the controls of my friend's Bonanza - even though I do not have a complex or high-perf. endorsement?

He was in the right seat, I was in the left. I was literally sole manipulator, because it is equipped with a single throw-over yoke. Meaning the one yoke can be flipped from the left seat to the right seat - but only one person at a time has a yoke in front of him.

This was the second time I had flown his plane, but it was the first time I actually landed it! He is very trustworthy, but I must say I didn't do too shabby for a rookie!!!
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Old 12-07-2007, 08:38 AM   #58 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by atcflyer
Another question since we're on the topic of logging flight time:

Can I log flight time when I was sole manipulator of the controls of my friend's Bonanza - even though I do not have a complex or high-perf. endorsement?
We'll keep this short:

Yes. The 61.51(e) clue is that "endorsements" are not "ratings" (and, for the English-impaired since this seems to come up surprisingly often, "or" doesn't mean "and").
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Old 12-13-2007, 02:57 AM   #59 (permalink)
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Yes your single engine land license says you can.
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Old 12-13-2007, 08:24 AM   #60 (permalink)
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When may I log PIC time?
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