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Old 01-25-2008, 12:28 AM   #81 (permalink)
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Thanks so much! seems so easy now, i can't believe i didn't figure it out!! its been driving me crazy, ahh i see, i was thinking the wind would be blowing straight from high to low which wasn't the case.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:39 AM   #82 (permalink)
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I read the question a couple times and gave up before my head exploded!
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Old 01-26-2008, 05:18 PM   #83 (permalink)
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Hello everybody i was wondering if somebody can help with something i need to start my training. i want to study in New Zealand but the course they offer there is just the integrated course with multi engine rating but i have also another option in Melbourne, AUS that i can study a Bachelor in AViation in a university. my question is what would be my possibilities if i study any of them when i want to get a job, would it increase with the bachelor degree or it won't a difference, so i can decide which one to choose i hope you can help me with this.
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Old 01-27-2008, 02:19 PM   #84 (permalink)
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yeah bachelors are helpful when finding a job but it just depends what all the other people applying have, hours would be more important I would imagine though. If you do choose new zealand you can do the bachelor of aviation through massey university or you can do the australian course from new zealand as a correspondence course. I wouldn't base your entire decision on where you can get a bachelor, choose the place that best suits all of your needs.
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Old 01-27-2008, 05:30 PM   #85 (permalink)
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thanks spitfired for the answer, but do you think it would help generally?, i really see australia as a really good opportunity, i see more things it can give me than new zealand and maybe im wrong but i think there are more options of work there? i really don't know im still researching, but thanks anyway!
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Old 01-27-2008, 05:53 PM   #86 (permalink)
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If your looking to join the airlines they will always be looking to get the best person they can so qualifications of any kind are always going to be in your favour, if you can get the bachelor done you might as well go for it. Australia will have more opportunities and is probably the better place to start at in my opinion.
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:59 PM   #87 (permalink)
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I Have another met question I can't figure out .

Why is the tropopause higher in winter than summer at the equator?

I would've thought that the density would be much less in summer over the equator so the tropopause would be much higher? But according to my Met Book I am wrong

Any help appreciated thanks.
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Old 02-12-2008, 08:14 PM   #88 (permalink)
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Just a guess here, but the temperature near the equator actually is pretty constant, however the northern hemisphere being colder the air will be denser and push the less dense air around the equator up.
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:54 PM   #89 (permalink)
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This has been idle for a while, so I'll ask a new one. Ive been curious as to whether ATC's have to get some kind of medical like pilots due? Are their like disqualifying factors and all that stuff that pilots need to go through? thanks!

Edit: One more question I have is actually a repeat from another thread... I'm sure I got an answer but I forgot to check, and now I cant seem to find the right thread (typical). It was something like, how do Air traffic controllers get positioned in various places. Can you apply to different places like a tower or tracon or something? Or do you just get assigned. What determines where you end up? Thanks for repeat answer.
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:26 PM   #90 (permalink)
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Yeah ATC controllers have to go through a medical aswell although its not quite as rigorous as pilots (It's called a class 3 medical in NZ). And with the positioning question, once they have finished their training they are placed in low traffic towers and move up from there to bigger cities etc.., once they have lots of experience they're put in radar centre or an international airport and can choose a position to train on such as apron, delivery etc, thats NZ anyway.
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Old 03-03-2008, 05:25 PM   #91 (permalink)
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Thanks spitfired,

I was listening to liveATC today and I have two question about what I heard, If anyone could explain.

1. I frequently hear "xxx cleared to land runway 27, traffic landing crossing runway will hold short of runway intersection" What does this mean, the other traffic will land on a different and intersecting runway, but they don't expect him to use the full length? Basically, how do they know they will hold short of the intersection, if their landing using the runway thats crossing? Maybe I just dont get that.

2. Another is use of "company". For example, "xxx follow company traffic ahead" or "company traffic on short final" Does this mean the traffic is the same company as whoever is being addressed? Or does it mean its a private jet or something corporate (aka a company)?

Thanks just curios
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Old 03-03-2008, 05:41 PM   #92 (permalink)
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1 It's called Land And Hold Short Operations (LAHSO) Basically the A/C that they expect to hold short of the crossing runway must accept the LAHSO clearance. Student pilots can not accept LAHSO clearances, and I believe airlines also can not accept them, also under my operation specifications I can not accept a LAHSO clearance if I'm flying under 135 rules. However accepting a LAHSO usually isn't too much of a problem in most smaller A/C as you'll usually still have several thousand feet of runway available.

2. They're telling the other A/C that the A/C in front of them is from the same company as they are.
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Old 03-03-2008, 08:34 PM   #93 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by Redguy
...Student pilots can not accept LAHSO clearances, and I believe airlines also can not accept them, also under my operation specifications I can not accept a LAHSO clearance if I'm flying under 135 rules. However accepting a LAHSO usually isn't too much of a problem in most smaller A/C as you'll usually still have several thousand feet of runway available....
Don't know about student pilots, but around here, anyone can get asked to land and hold short. In our types of aircraft (King Air, Navajo, Islander), we will pretty much always accept. I've heard ATC ask airliners to land and hold short, but they will only do that on the long runway. The runways at Halifax are shaped like a "T", with runway 05 being the long part of the T heading towards the crossing part. Landing on 05 and holding short of 14/32 means that you land in something like 8200' (or thereabouts) on a 8800' runway.
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Old 03-03-2008, 09:11 PM   #94 (permalink)
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They can ask anyone to do a LAHSO, but student pilots are not allowed to accept a LAHSO if I remember right. Same goes for when I'm flying 135, due to our ops specs we can not accept a LAHSO, but ATC can ask.
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Old 03-05-2008, 10:03 PM   #95 (permalink)
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You said that it's because of your ops specs - is that one particular ops spec that causes that limitation or is it a case of any Part 135 operator with ops specs"?
And just to make sure we're talking the same language, up here an ops spec is an add on to the operating certificate that allows lower limits to the general rules. For instance, we have an ops spec that allows us to take off in weather that is below the recommended landing weather (applies mainly to ceilings because we're still limited to 2600 RVR for the T/O) if we have a suitable take-off alternate that is within 1 hr.
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Old 03-05-2008, 10:43 PM   #96 (permalink)
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When I say ops specs, I mean the specific limitations in our operating specifications for our certificate. As far as I know there's no limitation against doing LAHSO's under part 135. It's actually kinda weird for us to have a limitation like that in our ops specs since for the most part our ops specs allow us to do things that normal 135 wouldn't, IE like yours we have lower take off Min's than standard, we can take off in weather as low as 1,200RVR with no celling requirement in the U.S. However in Canada, we have much higher limitations, we're limited to 1 mile vis, and I can't remember the celling, probably 2 or 300ft. We actually have to do a lower than standard take off demo on our check ride, which IMO is pretty dumb anyway since you really can't simulate that type of weather.
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Old 03-21-2008, 10:48 AM   #97 (permalink)
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Question not worth a whole thread:

I got an EKG today and chest x ray today as a "precaution" from this weird feeling I had in my chest for about a month. (doctor wanted to be sure). I'm pretty sure the results were perfectly fine, or at least that what the nurse implied. Regardless, is this something I should/need to mention at my next medical examination for flying? Thanks!
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Old 03-25-2008, 07:31 PM   #98 (permalink)
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"...I forget what the maneuver is called, but (at altitude of course) you try to keep the longitudinal axis straight while rolling about 30 degrees to either side. this requires opposite rudder and really helps learn to slip."

Called dutch rolls. I agree, it is an excellent maneuver for practicing side slip landings.
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Old 03-27-2008, 03:18 PM   #99 (permalink)
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Hey,

I hope you don't mind me asking a few questions from time to time - I'm not a student but I'm always looking for advice to be a better, safer pilot.

I've been reading a pretty decent book from Jerry Eichenberger called "Handling in-Flight Emergencies" and he recommended having some basic knowledge about airplane engine mechanics. Do any of you Airliners & CFIs have some advice on where I could learn get some basic introductory info on engine mechanics?

Thanks
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Old 04-01-2008, 11:13 PM   #100 (permalink)
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There are two weather topics that I admit I am not too clear on, but are very serious threats to aviation.

Anyone have a good, simple, accurate definition or explanation of the following two terms:

- mountain wave turbulence

- hook echo
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